Jorhat

    About the Centre

    The Regional Centre Jorhat, initially started in the year 1979 at the Assam Agricultural University campus is now running at Jamuguri Road, Jorhat – 785 004 with full fledged Institute infrastructure. The operational jurisdiction of the Centre is on 8 states of North-Eastern region comprising Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura. The Eastern Himalayan Regions, Meghalaya Plateau, Brahmaputra and Barak Valley Regions are treasure of natural resources including soils, vegetation, flora and fauna. This Regional Centre is entrusted for inventorization of soil resources of this region. Its activities are grouped into three categories viz. research, human resource development and capacity building of farmers through farmers-scientist interaction.

    Mandate
    • Soil Survey and mapping of soils of the North-Eastern Region of India at state, district, block, watershed, village and regional level to promote scientific land use programmes in collaboration with state agricultural and soil and water conservation departments, state agricultural universities and other user agencies.
    • Conducting and promoting research in the areas of Pedology, Soil Survey, Land Evaluation and Land Use Planning.
    • Conducting training on soil survey and land use planning with advanced remote sensing and GIS techniques to the officials of various state line departments.
    • Consultancy in the fields of Bureau’s specialization and expertise.
    List of Scientist
    Name Designation Discipline E-mail  
    Dr. Sanjay K. Ray Pr. Scientist & Head Soil Science skraysrs@yahoo.com View Biodata
    Dr. S. Ramachandran Scientist Soil Science rama007va@gmail.com View Biodata
    Sh. Roomesh Kumar Jena Scientist Soil Science roomeshjena@gmail.com View Biodata
    Sh. Prasenjit Ray Scientist Soil Science Prasenjit.iari@gmail.com View Biodata
    Sh. Partha Deb Roy Scientist Soil Science partha.slg09@gmail.com View Biodata
    Sh. Gulshan Kumar Sharma Scientist Environmental Science gulshansharma2222@gmail.com View Biodata
    Infrastructure

    Following physical facilities are available at the Centre :

    • An office building with spacious residential and office campus
    • Well equipped soil analytical laboratory
    • Conference room for meeting and training
    • Well stocked library
    • GIS laboratory with advanced remote sensing and GIS soft wares
    • Cartographic laboratory
    • Spacious soil drying and sample store room
    • 6 vehicles for field work (five Marshalls and one safari)
    • Children's Park

    Well equipped Soil Analytical Laboratory

    The Centre is equipped with excellent physical and chemical laboratory with sophisticated instruments like Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer, microwave digester, pressure membrane apparatus, flame photometer, spectrophotometer, pH meter, advanced Nitrogen estimation system (Kjeldahl), mechanical shaker, distillation systems, reverse osmosis and heavy duty centrifuge.

    Cartography

    The cartographic laboratory is well stocked with Survey of India topographic sheets of North Eastern Regions at various scales including aerial photographs and remotely sensed data products of LANDSAT and RESOURCESAT. In this laboratory base maps are prepared at various scales prior to digitization.

    GIS facility

    GIS laboratory is well furnished with updated desktop assemblage, laser and inkjet printers,  A-zero size scanner, plotter and with latest software like Arc GIS ver.10.0, Geomatica ver. 10.1, TNT Mips ver. 7.7, Definiens Professional, Geomedia, etc. In this laboratory various soil and soil based thematic maps are finalized after being interpreted in Cartographic laboratory followed by digitization in GIS environment.

    Library

    The Regional Centre has well furnished library including the latest stocks of national referred journals, books, manuals and popular magazines.

    Soil Resource Inventory

    The Centre has good infrastructure to take up soil resource inventory and land use planning related research in varied agro-ecological systems of North Eastern Regions.

    Any other matter

    Construction of a training hostel is in progress.

    Achievement (Project completed with very brief note)

    The Regional Centre, Jorhat is engaged in conducting research on soil survey and mapping, fertility mapping and land use planning in collaboration with relevant institutions and agencies.

    Institute Projects

    1. Soil resource mapping of North Eastern Region at state level (1:250,000 scale)
      The soils of the region including Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland and Tripura states were surveyed and mapped on 1:250,000 scale following three tier approach viz. image processing; field surveys and laboratory analysis; cartography and printings. Soil physiographic models were used for mapping the soils of the region and maps are published state wise on 1:500, 000 scale. The soil mapping units are the association of soil family. Legend includes major landforms, soil depth class, drainage, particle size class, surface texture and erosion.
    2. Soil resource mapping for district planning (1:50,000 scale)
      For district level planning soil resource mapping was conducted on 1:50,000 scale with soil series association as mapping unit including Jorhat, Sibsagar, Marigaon and Kamrup districts of Assam, East Khasi Hills and Ri-Bhoi districts of Meghalaya and parts of Luit and Tirap districts of Arunachal Pradesh.
    3. Soil nutrient status mapping for Assam and Tripura States
      Site Specific Nutrient Management (SSNM) is the most logical solution to address nutrient use efficiency. Soil nutrient mapping based on geo-referenced soil sampling, laboratory analysis, structuring data base in a GIS platform and subsequent interpolation can give a clear indication of the impact of land use and management on changing soil fertility scenario on a real time scale. The geo-referenced soil nutrient maps will be helpful as fertilizer decision support tool for nutrient application in a site specific mode. Soil Nutrient Mapping of South, West, North and Dhalai districts of Tripura at 2.0 km interval grid spacing and for 13 priority districts of Assam (now 16) including Barpeta, Bangaigaon, Goalpara, Kokrajhar, Nalbari, Sonitpur, Darrang, Udalguri, Nagaon, Marigaon, Chirang, Bagcha, Lakhinpur, Dhemaji, Tinsukia and Karbi-Anglong districts at 1.0 km grid spacing have been accomplished.
    4. Soil erosion assessment for monitoring soil degradation status
      Following multi-criteria overlay, several critical parameter of soil erosion was integrated in GIS for Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura states. The assessment of soil loss revealed that in Assam state, severe (20-40 t/ ha/ yr) to very severely (>40t/ ha/ yr) eroded soils together occupies 43.13% of area, whereas, in Meghalaya and Nagaland, severe (20-40 t/ ha/ yr) to extremely severely (>80 t/ ha/ yr) eroded soils together occupied 52.91% and 79.38% of area of the states respectively.
    5. Characterizing the soil resources in fluvial landforms of Majuli Island for land use using remote sensing and GIS. 
      A reconnaissance soil survey was carried out on 1:50,000 scale. The island has 43.2 per cent of area under sand bars, 13.6 percent of swamps 22.6 percent of flood plains (active and old), 11.8 percent of channel fills and 8.9 percent of natural levees. Thirteen soil series are identified and mapped into twenty five soil mapping units. Soils were evaluated for their suitability to twelve crops namely rice, wheat, mustard, potato, cabbage, peas, french bean, tomato, maize, alfalfa, cowpea and banana. The rice, mustard, cabbage, potato, french bean, tomato, maize, alfalfa, cowpea cropping system is mostly found suitable in channel fills (6.34 per cent) and active flood plains (7.8 percent). The rice-wheat, mustard, cabbage, pea, french bean, maize, alfalfa, cowpea system is suitable in Active flood plains (4.31 percent) and old flood plains (3.99 percent). The rice-potato, french bean, cabbage, peas, maize, alfalfa is suitable for active flood plains (4.42 per cent) whereas potato, cabbage, alfalfa, french bean, peas, cowpea, tomato system in natural levees during post rainy season only (9.3 percent).
    6. Mapping and assessment of nutrient status of soils in River Island Majuli, Assam.
      The status of available nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium of surface horizons of soil series were considered to derive five categories of fertility ratings viz., MLH, MLM, HLM, HLH, HMH. This rating scheme was followed for mapping unit groupings and in developing thematic map of nutrient status. The mapping units are grouped and estimated area under different categories. The six mapping units:- Adielengi - Bhakat –Chilkala, Bangaon-Bhakat-Garumara, Bharaki-Chilkala-Adielengi, Chilkala-Adielengi-Bhakat, Garumara-Bangaon and Kamalabari-Garumara-Bangaon have medium N, low P and medium to high K status. The other mapping units have high N, low P and high K status. The nutrient status shows distinct variation in soils on northern and southern banks of island. The soils in northern bank have high contents of NPK as compared to southern bank. Irrespective of soils in different land forms and textural variations, all soils are deficient in DTPA extractable Zn below the critical limit of 0.8 mgkg-1.
    7. A sustainable cropping system for rice fallows of Brahmaputra valley of Jorhat district of Assam
      In order to evolve a suitable cropping system for rice fallows two early maturing (120-130 days) varieties viz. Satya and Basundhara of rice were tested at different sites of Nagaon and Jamuguri village. Satya variety of rice performed better at both the sites than Basundhara registering an increase of 19.08% and 27.59% in seed yield over Basundhara at Nagaon and Jamuguri, respectively. The effect was more pronounced at Jamuguri than Nagaon soils. Combined use of SSP+MRP in 1:1 proportion resulted into a yield gain of 58.76 to 60% at Jamuguri pedon against 32.92-33.7% at Nagaon pedon over no P. Combined of SSP+MRP in 1:1 proportion proved advantageous than alone application of either sources. SSP proved better than MRP. Potato planted under residual P and moisture in rice fallows resulted in to a yield of 118.75 q/ha at Nagaon. Application of P to rice exerted considerable residual influence on potato. However, the yield of potato did not show considerable difference due various sources of P. The highest total productivity (110.90 q/ha) in terms of rice equivalent, production efficient (45.63 kg/ha/day) and land use efficiency (66.54%) was observed when potato was grown after Satya variety of rice under P and SSP + MRP (1:1 ratio) at Nagaon pedon. Experimental findings obviously indicated that rice fallows of Brahmaputra valley of Jorhat district, Assam can be successfully exploited by short season crops like black gram, green gram in spring/summer season and potato, rapeseed, french bean and peas during winter season with sizeable yield and monetary advantage.
    8. Soil resource mapping of Kamrup district (1:50,000) of Assam for land use planning.
      Forty soil series have been identified and they have been mapped on 1:50,000 scale with 33 soil mapping units at association of soil series. About 41% area of Kamrup district was level to nearly level (0-1% slope). Steep to very steep sloping areas (>50%) cover an area of 19.38%. Nearly 19% of total geographical area of the district is under slight erosion, 30% area under moderate erosion and 13% under severe to very severe erosion class. The soils of the district belong to 4 soil orders, 7 sub-orders and 13 great groups and 20 sub-groups. Inceptisols were the dominant soil order (34.09% of TGA) followed by Entisols (29.89% of TGA), Ultisols (16.03% of TGA) and Alfisols (14.11% of TGA). The most extensive areas are very strongly acidic soils (pH 4.5-5.0) covering 52.13% of area. The organic carbon status of surface soil in the district has been grouped into 4 classes and 79.47% area of the district belongs to high category. The soil mapping units in the district have been grouped into 5 land capability subclasses based on the dominant soils in a unit. The most extensive class is IVsw (25.81%) occurring mostly in alluvial plain and flood plain. VIes class dominantly belongs to hilly region of the state.
    9. Studies on infiltration, hydraulic conductivity and moisture storage of some soils of Jorhat district, Assam
      Twenty sites from different physiographic units of Jorhat district have been selected for the study. The infiltration class for sandy/loam texture in forest soils is moderately rapid. The tea garden soils have four permeability classes viz. moderate (loam/sandy clay loam), rapid (sandy loam/loam), moderately rapid (sandy loam/loam/silty clay loam) and moderately slow (sandy loam). The rice soils have only three classes viz. moderately slow (clay loam, loam, sandy loam), moderate (sandy loam) and moderately rapid in silt loam textures. It is observed that rice soils have retained more water than tea garden and forest soils. In rice soils, clay loam soils retained more stored water than loamy and sandy loam soils. In case of Tea garden soil, silty clay loam retains more water than loam and sandy loam. Similarly in forest soils, silty clay loam/silt loam soils retain more water than sandy loam soil. It is apparent from the study that texture, bulk density have influence on infiltration rate. To confirm the results at regional level, this study may extend further to develop regional level prediction and integrating data base for post rainy crop management strategies in paddy fallows of Brahmaputra valley.
    10. Detailed soil survey of Regional Rain- fed lowland rice research station farm, Gerua, Kamrup district, Assam 
      The farm is located at 26o11’N latitude and 94o47’E longitude comprising of an area of 12.5 ha. The soils of the farm have been developed on alluvium brought down by the river Brahmaputra. Depending upon the land situation the farm has been divided into 4 categories of landforms viz. medium land, moderately low land, low land and extremely low land. A high intensity detailed soil survey was carried on 1:5000 scale base map supplied by RRLRRS, Gerua and three soil series namely Gerua A, Gerua B and Gerua C have been identified and mapped. Soil pH ranges from 5.3 to 7.5. Organic carbon content in soils ranges from 0.27 to 1.87 gmkg-1. Available Nitrogen content of surface soils of the farm ranges from 150.86 to 678.89 kgha-1. The available phosphorus content in the soils of the farm ranges from 0.254 kgha-1 to 17.95 kgha-1 which have been rated as very low. Available potassium content in soils are dominantly low (<108 kgha-1) to high (>280 kgha-1) covering 93.52 percent and 0.26 percent area respectively.
    11. Soils of Bhareli River Basin for Land Use Planning
      The Bhareli river basin locating in between 26o02’45” to 27o09’55” N and 93o01’25” to 95o33’05” E covers an area of 1,53,737 ha. The upper part of the basin area comprising hilly terrain with moderately steep (15-30%) to very steep slope (>50%) belongs to Arunachal Pradesh and the lower part with nearly level (0-1%) to gently sloping (3-5%) land to Assam. River Bhareli drains the area to river Brahmaputra. The area has been divided into eight physiographic units viz. hilly terrain, piedmont zone, alluvial fan, flood plain, alluvial plain, aggraded valley, sand/gravel bar and inselberg. Reconnaissance soil survey has been carried out by using topobases on 1:50,000 generated through interpretation of satellite imagery and toposheet. 13 soil series have been identified and mapped in 10 soil mapping units at the level of association of soil series. Three orders viz. Entisols, Inceptisols and Alfisols have been identified covering 12570.74 ha, 77206.00 ha and 841.71 ha respectively.  Five family classes viz. sandy, coarse-loamy, fine-loamy, fine and loamy-skeletal have been identified. Inceptisols further have been divided into 4 subgroups viz. Fluventic Dystrudepts, Typic Dystrudepts, Humic Dystrudepts and Pachic Dystrudepts.

    Consultancy Projects

    1. Soils of Research Farm of ICAR Complex for NEH Region, Jharnapani and NRC on Mithun, Medziphema, Nagaland for optimizing land use
      Soils of two research farms of ICAR Complex for NEHR, Jharnapani and NRC Mithun, Medziphema have been surveyed for their characterization, mapping and identifying their problems and potentials. The soils have been mapped at phases level of soil series through a high intensively detailed survey on 1: 2000 scale. The area qualifies for hot moist sub-humid hyperthermic agro-ecological zones (17J) with LGP 270-300 days. Six soil series, viz., JhA, JhB, JhC, JhD, JhE and JhF have been identified and mapped in ICAR Complex covering 33.50 acre of area. Eight soil series have been identified in Research Farm of NRC on Mithun, Medziphema, viz., MdG, MdH, MdDI, MdJ, MdK, MdL, MdM and MdN covering an area of 135.15 acre. Soils of ICAR Complex Farm have been grouped into four land capability classes, viz., IIs, IIIe, IIIs and IVs. Class IVs covers the maximum area of 29.47% of the farm. Seven classes have been identified in NRC on Mithun Farm namely, IVs, Vies, Vis, VIIes, VIIe, VIIIes with two types of limitations, viz., reflecting unfavourable soil condition and soil erosion.
    2. Detailed Soil Survey of Research Farms of Paren and Jaluki village under Mbiu Reu Micro-watershed in Nagaland for Land Use Planning.
      Detailed soil survey on 1:1000 scale of two research farms of Paren and Jaluki village, Nagaland covering 7.5 ha and 2.4 ha respectively has been carried out. The area belongs to hot moist sub humid hyperthermic agro-ecological zone with LGP 270-300. Soils of Jaluki farm have been developed on table land with level (0-1%) to very gently slope (1-3%). Four series has been identified and mapped in the farm of Jaluki village and five soil series have been identified in the farm of Paren village. Grid points collected at an interval of 5m have been for generation of thematic maps of soil reaction, available nitrogen and available copper of Paren farm. Two classes viz. slight acidic (4.5-6.5) and neutral (6.5-7.5) have been identified which cover 5.8 ha and 1.70 ha respectively. 77.3 percent area of the farm has been rates as slightly acidic. The farm belongs to 3 categories of available nitrogen viz. high, medium and low which cover 4.69 ha, 2.61 ha and 0.20 ha, respectively. Copper content of soils have been rated as marginal (1.0-1.5 mgkg-1), in 2.79 ha, adequate (1.5-2.0 mgkg-1) covering 37.2 percent, 32.67 percent and 30.13 percent respectively.
    3. Assessment and mapping of important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the state of Tripura towards land use planning.
      The results showed that 49.2 percent area of the state belongs to strongly acidic (5.1-5.5) category followed by 24.46 percent under very strongly acidic (4.5-5.0). 70.78 percent of the state belongs to medium category of organic carbon (0.75-1.5%). Soils of majority area (about 36.32 percent of the state) have medium status of available nitrogen (280-450 kgha-1). Soils of 73.0 percent area are very low (< 25 kgha-1) in available phosphorus content. Soils of 51.0 percent of the state have medium level of (150-340 kgha-1) available potassium. All soils are sufficient in available Iron and Manganese and Copper content. However, soils of 16.40 percent area are deficient (<0.5 mgkg-1) in available Zinc. The study showed that soil acidity together with the low range P, moderate N & K status as well as deficient zones of zinc certainly indicate in general the low fertility status of the state and therefore requires attention regarding soil management practices for optimum agricultural production viz. liming of rain fed/ irrigated uplands and medium lands (pH <5.5) with limestone/dolomite, paper mill sludge, marketable lime as available locally in ground form (80 mesh size), in order to neutralize soil acidity. Adequate phosphorus fertilization depending upon crop and cropping sequence along with recommended dose of micronutrient application particularly zinc @25 kg ZnSO4 ha-1 every three years.
    4. Assessment and mapping of important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the state of Assam towards land use planning.
      The results showed wide range of spatial variability in various soil parameters among the 13 (now (16) priority districts of Assam. In Dhemaji district, extremely acidic soils were predominant followed by strongly acidic and very strongly acidic and moderately acidic soil covering 34.4%, 31.8%, 17.1% and 12.2% of area, respectively. High soil organic carbon was predominant in Nagaon and Lakhimpur district covering 90.4% and 74.3% of area respectively. It was observed that available nitrogen was low in 69.2% area of Udalguri district. In Sonitpur district, 28.9% of area is deficient in available zinc content.
    Ongoing Projects

    Institute Projects

    1. Assessment of heavy metal pollution and its mapping in soils of Nagoan and Tinsukia districts of Assam.
    2. Land resource inventory of East Lahing Gaon Panchayat of East Jorhat Development Block of Jorhat District, Assam.
    3. Land resource inventory of Katoni Gaon Panchayat of Titabar Block of Jorhat District, Assam
    4. Development of district level land use plan for Jorhat district in Assam under rain-fed ecosystem.
    5. Land use planning of Diring-Thanglong Micro-watershed of Karbi Anglong and Golaghat district of Assam under Hill and Mountain Eco-system for Integrated Development
    6. Study of crop moisture in the soils of Sibsagar district of Assam during post-kharif period.
    7. Correlation of soil series of North-Eastern States (Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland and Tripura).

    Collaborative Projects

    1. Enrichment of land degradation datasets with soils datasets of different states of India: North Eastern States.
    2. Soil microbial biomass C and N in selected soil series of North Eastern region as affected by different land uses and varied agro-climatic conditions.

    Consultancy Projects

    1. Assessment and mapping of important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the state of Sikkim towards land use planning.
    2. Assessment and mapping of important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the state of Nagaland towards land use planning.
    3. Soil and land capability map for land use planning, Dzongu Farm, North Sikkim.

    NAIP Project

    1. Geo referenced Soil Information System for Land Use Planning and Monitoring Soil and Land Quality for Agriculture.

    TSP Project

    1. A project entitled “Land resource inventory for farm planning at Bhomoraguri Missing Gaon, Pub Teok Circle” is undertaken under TSP programme.
    Capacity Building
    1. NNRMS (ISRO) sponsored training on “Remote Sensing and Geographical Information System in Land Resource Studies towards Land Use Planning” has been organized during 5th to 25th March, 2008 (21 days) for 15 trainees from Department of Agriculture, Arunachal Pradesh, Assam and Mizoram Government, Assam Agricultural University, North-East Hill University, Central Silk Board, Rubber Board and Defence Research Laboratory.
    2. Field Orientation training programme w.e.f. 17.03.09 to 26.03.09 have been organized to 11 newly joined scientists as well as technical officers to give an exposure in soil survey and mapping of North Eastern region at hill and mountain eco-system of Nagaland, low land of Kohra, Char area of Majuli island and upland tea growing soils of Sibsagar.
    3. NNRMS (ISRO)  sponsored training on “Application of Remote Sensing and Geographical Information System in Land Evaluation for Land Use Planning” has been organized during 9th to 30th January, 2011 (21 days) for 21 trainees of different State Department officials from Arunachal Pradesh, Meghalaya, Tripura, Nagaland and scientists from Assam Agricultural University and Krishi Vigyan Kendra.
    4. NNRMS (ISRO) sponsored 21 days training programme (24th January-13th February, 2012) on “Soil Resource Inventory for Watershed River Basin Development using Remote Sensing and GIS” at CTI Farm, Byrnihut, Re-Bhoi district, Meghalaya, imparted to the officials of Meghalaya.
    5. TSP sponsored 15 days training programme (20th March-3rd April, 2012) on “Geo-referenced Soil Resource Inventory and Mapping” at IETC, Medziphema, Nagaland, imparted to the officials of Nagaland.
    6. TSP sponsored one day training to the farmers of Bhomoraguri Missing village of Pub Teok Circle, Jorhat district, Assam on “Land resource management for Farm Planning” on 22.12.2012.

    Training Received

    1. Dr. S.K. Reza, Scientist have undergone training programme on “RS and GIS technology and application” organized by NRSC, Hyderabad during 19th Nov. 2008 to 6th Feb. 2009.
    2. Dr. S.K. Reza, Scientist and Sh. D.R. Gogoi, T-4 undertook advanced  training course in RS and GIS using PCI Geomatica 10.1 from 9th – 21st June 2008 at NBSS&LUP, Nagpur.
    3. Dr. S. Bandyopadhyay, Mr. P.K. Dutta, Mr. D.R. Gogoi, Mts. S. Chetia, Mr. V. Mohan and Mr. A. Baruah received 3 days training on TNT Mips on 14-16th September, 2009 at Regional Centre, Jorhat, Assam.
    4. Dr. S. Bandyopadhyay, Scientist of the regional centre undergone 21 days ISRO sponsored training on “Geoinformatics in Land Resource Management” at NBSS & LUP, Nagpur from 9th to 29th March, 2011.
    Linkages
    1. Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat, Assam
    2. Dept. of Agriculture, Govt. of Assam, Guwahati, Assam
    3. Dept. of Agriculture, Govt. of Meghalaya, Shillong, Meghalaya
    4. Dept. of Agriculture, Govt. of Nagaland, Kohima, Nagaland
    5. Dept. of Agriculture, Govt. of Sikkim, Gangtok, Sikkim
    6. Dept. of Soil & Water Conservation, Kohora, Karbi-Anglong, Assam
    7. ICAR Complex for NER, Barapani, Umium, Meghalaya
    8. Jagannath Baruah College, Jorhat, Assam
    9. ICAR Complex for NEHR , Jharnapani, Medziphema, Dimapur, Nagaland
    10. NRC on Mithun, Jharnapani, Medziphema, Dimapur, Nagaland
    Future Thrust Areas
    • Soil Survey: Detailed soil survey at Farm/Village/Panchayat/Block/District level.
    • Pedogenesis of North-Eastern Soils: Through total elemental analysis.
    • Soil Acidity: Distribution of different forms of acidity and its relation with Fe and Al to assess the pedogenic process involved in the soils of NER.
    • Soil Pollution: Different types of pollution (like heavy metals/Flouride/Arsenic) in soils of contaminated areas of NER and its risk assessment for environmental safety.
    • Application of Geo-informatics for soils of North Eastern Regions.
    • Study of soil hydraulic properties of North Eastern Regions on watershed basis.
    • Demand driven Soil Nutrient Status Mapping.
    Major Publications (Research papers/Reports/Technical Bulletins)
    1. Reza, S.K., Baruah, U. and Sarkar, D. (2012). Hazard assessment of heavy metal contamination by the paper industry, north-eastern India.International Journal of Environmental Studies. DOI:10.1080/00207233.2012.746810. (Taylor and Francis Group, U.K.)
    2. Reza, S.K., Baruah, U. and Sarkar, D. (2012). Spatial variability of soil properties in Brahmaputra plains of North-eastern India: A geostatistical approach. Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science, 60:108-115.
    3. Reza, S.K., Pal, S. and Singh, S. (2012). Rock phosphate-enriched pressmud compost: Direct effect in pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.) and residual effect in mustard (Brassica juncea) in a Typic Haplustept. Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science, 60: 138-144.
    4. Reza, S.K., Baruah, U. and Sarkar, D. (2012). Mapping risk of soil phosphorus deficiency using geostatistical approach: A case study of Brahmaputra plain, Assam, India. Indian Journal of Soil Conservation, 40:65-69.
    5. Reza, S.K., Baruah, U., Sarkar, D. and Dutta, D.P. (2011). Influence of slope positions on soil fertility index, soil evaluation factor and microbial indice in acid soil of Humid Subtropical India. Indian Journal of Soil Conservation, 39:44-49.
    6. Panwar, P., Pal, S., Reza, S.K. and Sharma, B. (2011). Soil fertility index, soil evaluation factor, and microbial indices under different land uses in acidic soil of Humid Subtropical India. Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, 42:2724–2737.
    7. Pal, S., Datta, S.C. and Reza, S.K. (2011). Interrelationship of organic acids and aluminum concentrations in rhizosphere and nonrhizosphere soil solution of rice in acidic soil. Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis. 42:932–944.
    8. Bhaskar, B.P., Baruah, U., Vadivelu, S., Raja, P. and Sarkar, D. (2010). Remote Sensing and GIS in the Management of Wetland Resources of Majuli Island, Assam, India. Tropical Ecology, 5:31-40.
    9. Chattaopadhyay, T., Varadachari C. and Ghosh, K. (2010). Complexation  of humic substances by allophone. Clay Research 29 ( 1&2) , 15-22 p.
    10. Sahoo, A.K., Sarkar, Dipak, Baruah, U and Butte, P.S. (2010). Characterization, classification and evaluation of soils of Langol Hill, Manipur for rational land use planning.Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science 58, pp 355-362.
    11. Reza, S.K., Ahmed, N. and Pal, S. (2010). Evaluation of pedological development of soils developed on lower reaches of Siwalik hills through filed morphological rating system. Indian Journal of Soil Conservation, 38:101-104.
    12. Reza, S.K., Baruah, U., Sarkar, D. and Das, T.H. (2010). Evaluation and comparison of ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighting methods for predication of spatial variability of some chemical parameters of Dhalai district, Tripura. Agropedology, 20: 38-48.
    13. Pal, S., Patra, A.K., Reza, S.K., Wildi, W. and Poté, J. (2010). Use of Bio-Resources for Remediation of Soil Pollution. Natural Resources, 1:110-125.
    14. Reza, S.K., Ahmed, N. and Pal, S. (2010). Characterization, classification and mapping of soils of Panja-Rao watershed, Saharanpur, Uttar Pradesh. Agropedology, 20:124-132.
    15. Varadachari, C., Saha, S., Bandyopadhay, S. and Ghosh, K. (2009). Bio-release Multi-nutrient Fertilizers for High Altitude Agriculture. Mountain Research and Development, Vol 29 (3), International Mountain society, Switzerland,
    16. Kandeepan, G., Shahnawaz Ali, Shiv Lal, Bandyopadhyay, S., Kharbikar, L. and Ahmed, I. (2009). An innovative approach to supply biogas (gober gas) in rubber balloons for domestic use: A case study & success story. Paper presented in Souvenir of National Seminar on "Wealth from livestock and agriculture waste" at VC& RI (TANUVAS) Namakkal, Tamil Nadu.
    17. Bhaskar, B.P., Baruah, U., Vadivelu, S., Raja, P. and Sarkar, Dipak (2009). Pedogenesis in Some Subaqueous Soils of Brahamaputra Valley of Assam. J. of Indian Soc. of Soil Science, 57:237-244.
    18. Bhaskar, B.P., Saxena, R.K., Vadivelu, S., Baruah, Utpal, Sarkar, D., Raja, P. and Butte, P.S. (2009). Intricacy in Classification of Pine Growing Soils in Shillong Plateau, Meghalaya, India. Soil Survey Horizons, Spring Issue, 11-16 (under Aegis of SSS of American Journal).
    19. Bandyopadhay, S., Bhattacharya, I, Varadachari, C. and Ghosh, K. (2008). New Slow-releasing Molybdenum Fertilizer. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol 56 (4), pp 1343-1349,  American Chemical Society.
    20. Bhaskar, B.P., Baruah, Utpal, Vadivelu, S. and Sarkar, D. (2007). Characterization and Depositional Soils in Dynamic Fluvial Landforms of Majuli Island for Land Use Related Issues. Agropedology, 18:33-43.
    21. Bhattacharya, I., Bandyopadhay, S., Varadachari, C. and Ghosh, K. (2007). Development of a Novel Slow-releasing Iron-Manganese Fertilizer Compound. Industrial Engineering and Chemistry Research, Vol 46, pp 2870-2876, American Chemical Society.
    22. Bhaskar, B.P., Baruah, U., Vadivelu, S., Butte, P.S. and Dutta, D.P. (2006). Mapping and Profile Distribution of Potassium Forms in Hill Land Soils of Narang –Kongripara Watershed, Meghalaya. J. of Potassium Research.
    23. Singh, R.S., Dubey, P.N., Sen, T.K., and Maji, A.K. (2006). Distribution of potassium in soils of Manipur encompassing physiographic and hydrothermal variations. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 54:197-202.
    24. Baruah Utpal, Bhaskar, B.P., Vadivelu, S. and Mishra, J.P. (2006). Land Evaluation for Rapeseed (Brassica campestins L.) and Mustard (Brassica juncea L.) in Nagaon District, Assam. Agropedology. No.15 1163-69.
    25. Baruah, U., Bhaskar, B.P., Vadivelu, S. and Mishra, J.P. (2005). Land evaluation for rapeseed/mustard in Nagaon district, Assam. Agropedology, 15:63-69.
    26. Bhaskar, B.P., Baruah, U., Vadively, S. and Butte, P.S. (2005).Characterization of soils in the ‘Bil’ environment of Brahmaputra valley in Jorhat district, Assam for land use interpretation. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 53:3-10.
    27. Vadivelu, S., Baruah, U., Bhaskar, B.P., Thampi, J., Sarkar, D. and Butte, P.S. (2005). Evaluation of soil suitability to Rice-based cropping in the River island, Majuli, Assam. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 53:35-40.
    28. Vadivelu, S., Mishra, J.P., Thampi, J. and Baruah, U. (2005). Suitable cropping system for Rice fallow of Brahmaputra valley. J. of Agricultural Resource Management. 4.
    29. Bhaskar, B.P., Mishra, J.P., Baruah, U., Vadivelu, S., Sen, T.K., Butte, P.S. and Dutta, D.P. (2004). Soils on Jhum cultivated hill slope of Narang-Kongripara watershed in Meghalaya. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 52:125-133.
    30. Bhaskar, B.P., Saxena, R.K., Vadivelu, S., Baruah, U., Putte, P.S. and Dutta, D.P. (2004). Pedogenesis in high altitude soils of Meghalaya Plateau.Agropedology, 14:9-23.
    31. Mishra, J.P., Baruah, U., Vadivelu, S., Bhaskar, B.P. and Tomar, S.S. (2004). Exploiting rice fallows of Brahmaputra valley of Assam – opportunities and constraints. Indian Farming. 54:3-8.
    32. Vadivelu, S., Sharma, J.P., Raja, P., Bhaskar, B.P., Gajbhiye, K.S., Baruah, U., Sarkar, D., Butte, P.S. and Dutta, D.P. (2004). Soil-site suitability evaluation in two different agro-ecological systems and relevance of the parameters. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 52:177-183.
    33. Sen, T.K., Dubey, P.N., Nayak, D.C., Baruah, U., Bhattacharyya, T., Maji, A.K. and Velayutham, M. (2003). Soil resource information for agricultural planning and development of Assam. Agropedology, 13:50-59.
    34. Vadivelu, S., Baruah, U., Bhaskar, B.P., Thampi, J., Sarkar, D., Walia, C.S., Nayak, D.C. and Maji, .K. (2003). A land use plan for Jorhat district of Assam state. Agropedology, 13:1-10.
    35. Vadivelu, S., Baruah, U, Bhaskar, B.P., Thampi, J., Sarkar, D., Walia, C.S., Nayak, D.C. and Maji, A.K. (2003). A Land Use Plan for Jorhat District of Assam State. Agropedology, 2003, 13, 1-10.
    36. Sarkar, Dipak, Baruah, U., Gangopadhyay, S.K., Sahoo, A.K. and Velayutham, M. (2002). Characteristics and classification of soils of Loktak catchment area of Manipur for sustainable land use planning. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 50:196-204.
    37. Sen, T.K., Dubey, P.N. and Chatterji, S. (2002). Forms and distribution of phosphorus in some acid soils in Manipur and Assam. Agropedology,12:122-127.
    38. Sarkar, Dipak, Baruah, U., Gangopadhyay, S.K., Sahoo, A.K. and Velayutham, M. (2002). Characteristics and classification of soils of Loktak catchment area of Manipur for sustainable land use planning. J. Indian Soc. Soil Science, Vol.50, No.2. pp.196-204.
    39. Bhaskar,B.P., Vadivelu, S., Baruah, U., Butte, P.S., Dutta, D.P. and Mishra, J.P. (2001). Distribution of Potassium forms in Chars and Marshy soils of Brahmaputra valley, Jorhat district, Assam. Journal of Potassium Research, Vol.17, No.1 to 4. pp.39-47.
    40. Vadivelu, S., Baruah, U., Sarkar, D. and Butte, P.S. (2001). Delineation and characterization of flood deposited sediments in Dhemaji district, Assam.J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 49:521-524.
    41. Vadivelu, S., Sen, T.K., Bhaskar, B.P., Thampi, Jiji, Baruah, U. and Mishra, J.P. (2001). Mapping of available potassium in the soils of Assam.Agropedology, 12:29-37.
    42. Gangpadhayay, S.K., Baruah, U., Nayak, D.C., Sen, T.K., Singh, R.S., Maji, A.K. and Sarkar, D. (2000). Soils of North-Eastern India – their characteristics, problems and potential. Indian J. Landscape System, 22:65-75.
    43. Bhaskar, B.P., Vadivelu, S., Baruah, U., Butte, P.S., Dutta, D.P. and Mishra, J.P.  (2000). Distribution of potassium forms in chars and marshy soils of Brahmaputra valley, Jorhat Distt. Assam. J. Potassium Res., 17:39-47.
    44. Baruah, U. and Vadivelu, S. (1999). Soil map for sustainable rice production in Assam. J. Hill Geogr., XV:20-24.
    45. Gangopadhyay, S.K., Bhattacharyya, T. and Sarkar, Dipak. (1999). Characteristics and classification of some forest soils of South Tripura. Van Vighan, 37:11-17.
    46. Bhattacharyya, T., Dubey, P.N., Das, T.K., Baruah, U., Gangopadhyay, S.K. and Kumar, D. (1998). Soil formation as influenced by geomorphic processes in the Brahmaputra flood plains of Assam. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 46:647-657.
    47. Bhattacharyya, T., Mukhopadhyay, S., Baruah, U. and Chamuah, G.S. (1998). Need for soil study to determine degradation and landscape stability.Current Sci. 74:42-47.
    48. Bhattacharyya, T., Sarkar, D., Gangopadhyay, S.K., Dubey, P.N., Baruah, U., Chamuah, G.S., Mukhopadhyay, S., Nayak, D.C., Maji, A.K., Saxena, R.K., Barthwal, A.K., Krishna,.N.D.R., Mandal, C., Sehgal, J., Bhowmick, K.R., Sinha, K., Chakraborty, S., Nandi Mazumdar, S., Pal, P.K., Krishna Kumar, A.K. and Sethuraj, M.R. (1998). Soils of Tripura-1. Characterisation and Classification Agropedology, 8:47-54.
    49. Bhattacharyya, T., Sarkar, D., Gangopadhyay, S.K., Dubey, P.N., Baruah, U., Chamuah, G.S., Mukhopadhyay, S., Nayak, D.C., Maji, A.K., Saxena, R.K., Barthwal, A.K., Krishna,.N.D.R., Mandal, C., Sehgal, J., Bhowmick, K.R., Sinha, K., Chakraborty, S., Nandi Mazumdar, S., Pal, P.K., Krishna Kumar, A.K. and Sethuraj, M.R. (1998). Soils of Tripura-II. Suitability for Rubber. Agropedology, 8:55-60.
    50. Gangopadhyay, S.K., Walia, C.S., Chamuah, G.S. and Baruah, U. (1998). Rice growing soils of Upper Brahmaputra valley of Assam: their characteristics and suitability. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 46:103-109.
    51. Sen, T.K., Dubey, P.N., Maji, A.K. and Chamuah, G.S. (1997). Status of micronutrients in some dominant soils of Manipur. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 45:245-249.
    52. Sen, T.K., Nayak, D.C., Singh, R.S., Dubey, P.N., Maji, A.K., Chamuah, G.S. and Sehgal, J.L. (1997). Pedology and edaphology of benchmark acid sols of north-eastern India. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 45:782-790.
    53. Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1997). Characteristics and classification of some soils derived from different parent materials in Arunachal Pradesh.J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 45:401-404.
    54. Bhattacharyya, T., Baruah, U., Gangopadhyay, S., Dileep Kumar (1997). Characterization of some Aquepts occurring in Assam valley. Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science, Vol.45, No.4. pp.791-796.
    55. Baruah, U. and Mahapatra A.C. (1996). Slope mass movement and associated soils in east Khasi and Jaintia Hills of Meghalaya. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 44:712-717.
    56. Chamuah, G.S., Dubey, P.N., Walia, C.S. and Sen, T.K. (1996). Relationship between soil pH and base saturation as affected by topography.Agropedology, 6:121-123.
    57. Nayak, D.C., Sen, T.K., Chamuah, G.S. and Sehgal, J.L. (1996). Nature of soil acidity in some soils of Manipur. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 44:209-214.
    58. Sen, T.K., Baruah, U., Maji, A.K., Chamuah, G.S. and Sehgal, J.L. (1996). Remote sensing approach to detect temporal changes in the course of the Brahmaputra river. Agropedology, 6:23-28.
    59. Sen, T.K., Chamuah, G.S., Nayak, D.C., Singh, R.S. and Sehgal, J.L. (1996). Characteristics and classification of some soils of Manipur valley. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 44:538-541.
    60. Sen, T.K., Nayak, D.C., Dubey, P.N., Chamuah, G.S. and Sehgal, J.L. (1996). Highly leached mineral soils of Manipur – their pedology, characteristics, problems and management. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 44:718-722.
    61. Walia, C.S. and hamuah, G.S. (1996). Characterization of some Inceptisols of Arunachal hills. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 44:179-182.
    62. Baruah, U., Chamuah, G.S. and Sen, T.K. (1995). Climatic zones of north-east India using water balance studies. Geogr. Rev. India, 41:45-53.
    63. Baruah, U., Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1995). Land use potentials of Kamrup district of Assam. Natl. Geogr. J. India, 41:155-161.
    64. Bhattacharyya, T. and Ghosh, S.K. (1994). Nature and characteristics of naturally occurring clay-organic complex of two soils from north-eastern region. Clay Res., 13:1-9.
    65. Bhattacharyya, T., Sen, T.K., Singh, R.S., Nayak, D.C. and Sehgal, J. (1994). Morphology and classification of Ultisols with Kandic Horizon in North East Region. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 42:301-306.
    66. Sen, T.K., Chamuah, G.S. and Sehgal, J.L. (1994). Occurrence and characteristic of some Kandi soils in Manipur. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 42:297-300.
    67. Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1994). Soils reverine plain in Arunachal Pradesh and their suitability for some agricultural crops. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 42:425-429.
    68. Nair, K.M. and Chamuah, G.S. (1993). Exchangeable aluminium in soils of Meghalaya and management of Al3+ related productivity constraints. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 41:331-334.
    69. Baruah, U., Chamuah, G.S. and Maji, A.K. (1992). Variability in surface soil properties related to geomorphology in north-east India. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 40:881-884.
    70. Sen, T.K., Pande, L.M., Sehgal, J.L., Maji, A.K. and Chamuah, G.S. (1992). Satellite remote sensing in soil resource inventory of Dibrugarh dist. (Part), Assam. Photonirvachak, 20:95-104.
    71. Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1992). Flood affected soils of Brahmaputra valley and their suitability for land use planning. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 40:335-340.
    72. Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1992). Soil profile development in relation to land   use. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 40:220-222.
    73. Singh, R.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1991). Morphology and characteristics of some soils on different landforms in Kamrup district, Assam. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 39:209-211.
    74. Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1991). Soil and land suitability evaluation for plantation crops. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 39:404-407.
    75. Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1990). Characteristics, classification and suitability for land use planning of foothill soils. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 38:286-292.
    76. Chamuah, G.S., Borthakur, H.P., Walia, C.S., Nair, K.M. and Phukan, B.N. (1989). Assessment of soil survey information in crop response to applied nutrients. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 37:87-91.
    77. Nair, K.M., Chamuah, G.S. and Deshmukh, S.N. (1989). Forest soils of Meghalaya, their characterization, classification and constraints to productivity.Van Vigyan, 27:34-41.
    78. Chamuah, G.S. (1988). Effect of liming and method of nitrogen application on dwarf rice grown on Inceptisols. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 36:185-186.
    79. Chamuah, G.S. and Dey, S.K. (1988). Effect of some metabolic inhititors on cation exchange capacity of plant roots. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 36:225-227.
    80. Nair, K.M. and Chamuah, G.S. (1988). Characteristics and classification of some pine forest soils of Meghalaya J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 36:142-145.
    81. Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1988). Influence of topography on catenary soils in old flood-plain of Assam. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 36:825-827.
    82. Chamuah, G.S. (1987). Potassium status of some soils growing rice. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 35:132-134.

    Bulletins/Technical Reports/Soil Survey Reports/Resource Atlases

    1. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Sonitpur District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (A).
    2. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Darrang District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (B).
    3. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Goalpara District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (C).
    4. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Kokrajhar District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (D).
    5. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Bangaigaon District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (E).
    6. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Barpeta District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (F).
    7. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Nalbari District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (G).
    8. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Marigaon District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (H).
    9. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Nagaon District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (I).
    10. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Lakhimpur District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (J).
    11. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Dhemaji District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (K).
    12. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Tinsukia District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (L).
    13. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Karbi-Anglong District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (M).
    14. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Chirang District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (N).
    15. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Bagsa District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (O).
    16. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Udalguri District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (P).
    17. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micronutrients for optimum land use planning of Tripura state: West District. (2010). Report No. 1031 (a). NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    18. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micronutrients for optimum land use planning of Tripura state: North District. (2010). Report No. 1031 (b). NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    19. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micronutrients for optimum land use planning of Tripura state: South District. (2010). Report No. 1031 (c). NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    20. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micronutrients for optimum land use planning of Tripura state: Dhalai District. (2010). Report No. 1031 (d). NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    21. Assessment and Mapping of Some Important Soil Parameters including Macro and Micronutrients for Optimum Land Use Planning, West District, Tripura (2010). Report No.1031 (a), NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    22. Assessment and Mapping of Some Important Soil Parameters including Macro and Micronutrients for Optimum Land Use Planning, North District, Tripura (2010). Report No.1031 (b), NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    23. Assessment and Mapping of Some Important Soil Parameters including Macro and Micronutrients for Optimum Land Use Planning, South District, Tripura (2010). Report No.1031(c), NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    24. Assessment and Mapping of Some Important Soil Parameters including Macro and Micronutrients for Optimum Land Use Planning, Dhalai District, Tripura. (2010). Report No.1031 (d), NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    25. Soil Survey of Bhareli River basin, Assam for land use planning. 2008, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    26. Soils of Research Farms of ICAR Complex for North Eastern Hill Area, Jharnapani and NRC for Mithun, Medziphema, Nagaland for Optimizing Land Use (2008). Report No.1012, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    27. Detail Soil Survey of Research Farm for Optimizing Land Use at Soil Conservation Training Institute, Byrnihat, Meghalaya (2008). Report No.1013, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    28. Detailed soil survey report of (i) ICAR Complex farm, Jharnapani and NRC Mithun farm, Medziphema, Nagaland. Report No. 1012, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    29. Detail Soil Survey of Research Farm, Regional Rainfed Low Land Rice Research Station, Gerua, Kamrup District, Assam (2008). Report No.1024, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    30. Characterizing the soil resources in the dynamic fluvial land forms of Majuli Island for land use related issues using Remote Sensing and Geographical Information System (2006). Report No.949, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    31. Land use planning of Cherrapunji, Meghalaya – Soil Resources and Agro-Ecological assessment. (2006). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.131. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    32. Soil Series of Manipur. (2006). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.134. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    33. Reflectance Libraries for Development of Soils and Chars for Periodic Assessment of Soil Resources (2005). Report No.810, NBSS&LUP, ICAR, Nagpur.
    34. Impact of Fluvial Processes on Land Formation with Spatial Reference to Chars and Bils in the Brahmaputra Valley (2005). Report No.850, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    35. Soils of Krishnagiri Farm, Longol Hill, ICAR Complex, Manipur (2005). Report No.851, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    36. Soil Resource Inventory of Some Command Area (Charaipani, Deogharia and Bengenakhowa) of Titabar Tehsil, Jorhat District, Assam (2004). Report No.699, NBSS&LUP, ICAR, Nagpur.
    37. Soil Series of Meghalaya. (2005). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.121. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    38. Soil Erosion of Assam. (2005). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.118. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    39. Rainfed Rice Production System (NATP-RRPS-17) (2004). Report No.796, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    40. Soils of Optimizing Land Use of Kamrup District, Assam (2008). Report No.604, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    41. Soil Series of Assam. (2004). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.101. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    42. Soil Series of Sikkim. (2004). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.105. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    43. Soil resource Atlas of Jorhat District. (2004). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.107. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    44. Soil Series of Nagaland. (2004). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.109. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    45. Soil Series of Tripura. (2004). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.111. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    46. Identification, characterization, delineation of agro-economic constraints of oilseed based production system in rainfed eco-system. NATP Project ROPS-II (2003). Report No.629, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    47. Land use planning for management of agricultural resources (Hill & Mountain Eco-system), Narang-Kongripara Watershed, Ri-bhoi District, Meghalaya (2003). NATP MM-III, 28, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    48. Land Capability of Catchment of Loktak Lake, Manipur (2002). Report No.594,  NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    49. Soil Erosion of Tripura, a Model for Soil Conservation and Crop Performance. (2002). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.97. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    50. Soils of Mizoram for optimizing land use. (2001). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.75b. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    51. Soils of Nagaland for optimizing land use. (2000). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.67b. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    52. Sand deposition by floods in Dhemaji district of Assam. (1999). NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    53. Soils of Assam for optimizing land use. (1999). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.66b. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    54. Soils of Meghalaya for optimizing land use. (1999). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.52b. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    55. Soils of Arunachal Pradesh for optimizing land use. (1996). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.55b. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    56. Soils of Manipur for optimizing land use. (1996). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.56c. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    57. Soils of Sikkim for optimizing land use. (1996). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.60b. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    58. Soils of Tripura for optimizing land use. (1996). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.65b. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    59. Soils of Tripura for optimizing land use. (1996). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.65a & c. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    60. Soil Survey Report of Sibsagar District, Assam (1995). Report No.529, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    61. Soil Survey Report of Morigaon District, Assam (1994). Report No.527, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    62. District Soil Survey Report of Jorhat for Land Use Planning. Report No.526,  NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    63. Soil Survey Report of Lohit District (Part), Arunachal Pradesh (1991). Report No.521, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    64. Soil Survey & Land Evaluation of Mopakhat Project, Kanubari Circle, District- Tirap, Arunachal Pradesh (1990). Report No.518, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    65. Soil Survey Report of Longding and Wakha Circle, District- Tirap, Arunachal Pradesh (1989). Report No.512, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    66. Soils of Buralikson Sugarcane Farm, AAU, District- Golaghat (1989). Report No.513, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    67. Soil Survey Report of Livestock Research Station Farm, AAU at Village Mondira, PS- Boko, District- Kamrup, Assam. (1987). Report No.497, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    68. Soil Survey Report of Honowal Tea Estate, Bhogdoi Watershed, Mariani Thana, Jorhat District, Assam. (1984). Report No.468, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    69. Soil Survey Report of Banana Progenui Orchard- cum Nursary Farm, Kheroni, Karbi Anglong District, Assam. (1984). Report No.465, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    70. Soil Survey Report of Majuli Sub-division, Jorhat District, Assam (1984). Report No.469, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    71. Soils of North Eastern Regions. (1981). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.2. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
    Book Chapters
    1. Saxena, R.K., Baruah, Utpal and Mandal, D.K. (2009). Soil Physiographic Relationship – A case Studies from the Himalayan Region. Soil Survey Manual, Tech. Bulletin, NBSS Publ. No.146.
    2. Baruah, Utpal, Das, T.H., Maji, A.K. and Sarkar, Dipak (2007). Soil Resources of Nagaland vis-à-vis its Degradation towards Optimum Land Use Planning. North Eastern Regional Institute of Water & Land Management, Tezpur, Assam.
    3. Das, T.H., Baruah, Utpal, Sarkar, Dipak and Maji, A.K. (2007). Soils of North Eastern Region – their Evaluation for Optimum Land Use Planning. North Eastern Regional Institute of Water & Land Management, Tezpur, Assam.
    4. Baruah, Utpal, Vadivelu, S. and Bhaskar, B.P. (2003). Delineation and characterization of floods and deposits in Dhemaji district for productive land use. Flood Problems of Assam: Causes and Remedies. Edt. by Sabha Pandit, Omsons Publication, New Delhi.
    5. Baruah, U., Wright, R.L. (1993). Slope Mass Movement and Soils in Part of the North Eastern Region of India. Land Evaluation for Land Use Planning, Ed. by Dent, D.L. and Despande, S.B. NBSS Publ. 42.
    6. Bhattacharyya, B.K, Baruah, U., Sarma, R. and Sarma, A. (1984). Agricultural Atlas of Assam. Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat.
    7. Baruah, U. (1979). Role of HYV in Agricultural Development in Panjub and Haryana – A Case Study in Spatial Variation. Mohammad, A. (Ed), Dynamics of Agril. Dev. in India, Concept Publishing Co., New Delhi.
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